PlumberI hate fix­ing house­hold plumb­ing problems.

It’s not that plumb­ing is hard or even all that unpleas­ant, really.  And that’s the infu­ri­at­ing part: the fact that plumb­ing would be — should be!?! — down­right easy if you just didn’t have to:

  • nego­ti­ate way-too-tight spaces,
  • avoid smack­ing your hand against hot-enough-to-burn-you stuff,
  • over­come rusted bolts,
  • make yet another trip to the store to get a needed part, tool, etc.
  • deal with the worry of mak­ing a costly mistake

Hon­estly, what kind of shade tree mechanic or home fixer-guy hasn’t bitched about one of these things?  It’s the lux­ury of being a shade-tree mechanic or home-fixer guy.

But real pro­fes­sion­als don’t have that luxury.

True pros know con­di­tions are never ideal.  And they know their rep­u­ta­tions and pay­checks rest on results achieved in far-from-ideal con­di­tions.

Real plumbers expect to fix plumb­ing prob­lems while on their backs, star­ing up at the under­side of a cab­i­net, and work­ing with rusted bolts.  That’s how it is in the real world, and so they train for it. Because no one pays you to be an imag­i­nary plumber in a make believe world where the pipes are all out in plain site.

I half-wanted to draw out the anal­ogy between this and copy­writ­ing, adver­tis­ing, and mar­ket­ing, but I won’t insult your intel­li­gence.  Just let me ask you:

Are you a real pro­fes­sional at your cho­sen vocation?

Do you train your­self to han­dle far-from-ideal con­di­tions and situations?

Or are you too busy dream­ing of the per­fect client/product/competitive mar­ket and bitch­ing about the mar­ket­ing equiv­a­lents of rusted bolts and tight spaces?

Comments

  1. Shane Arthur on 12.16.2009

    Cool anal­ogy. Very cool indeed.

  2. Shara Nondorf on 12.07.2010

    I really like this site. Wewish we could come here everyday\all day.

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