Paul Wolfe was kind enough to nom­i­nate me for this “con­test” and, in an effort not to let him down, I’ve pro­duced the fol­low­ing rin response to the 7 ques­tions / cat­e­gories of links:

Your most beau­ti­ful post
While I hes­i­tate to call any of my posts beau­ti­ful (as none of the prose qual­i­fies), there have been one or two posts on beau­ti­ful and heart­felt sub­jects, and this inter­view with Steven Press­field is one of them:
http://www.jeffsextonwrites.com/2011/04/steven-pressfields-newest-novel/
And just in case an “inter­view post” is con­sid­ered cheat­ing, I’ll throw this one in as well:
http://www.jeffsextonwrites.com/2010/12/a-belated-thank-you/
– Your most pop­u­lar post
http://www.jeffsextonwrites.com/2010/02/switch-the-heath-bros-and-all-about-elephants-riders-and-paths/
– Your most con­tro­ver­sial post
http://www.jeffsextonwrites.com/2010/01/better-web-marketing-for-best-made-axe/
– Your most help­ful post
http://www.jeffsextonwrites.com/2010/09/inceptions-4-rules-for-ultimate-influence/
– A post whose suc­cess sur­prised you
http://www.jeffsextonwrites.com/2010/01/winning-isnt-normal/
– A post you feel didn’t get the atten­tion it deserved
http://www.jeffsextonwrites.com/2011/01/a-first-class-ticket/
– The post that you are most proud of
http://www.copyblogger.com/copywriting-details/

Your most beau­ti­ful post

2011-04-28_1725While I hes­i­tate to call any of my posts beau­ti­ful (as none of the prose qual­i­fies), there have been one or two posts on beau­ti­ful and heart­felt sub­jects, and this inter­view with Steven Press­field is one of them And just in case an “inter­view post” is con­sid­ered cheat­ing, I’ll throw this one in as well:

Your most pop­u­lar post

2010-02-09_2309-203x300In look­ing back through Google Ana­lyt­ics, the front-runner for page views was this pre-release review of Dan and Chip Heath’s highly antic­i­pated book, Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard.

But I tend to sus­pect that the front-runner posi­tion of that post has a lot more to do with the pop­u­lar­ity of the Heath Bros’ (deservedly) best-selling book, and a lot less to do with any par­tic­u­lar blog­ging excel­lence on my part. Luck­ily for me, my close-second most pop­u­lar post was also my most controversial…

Your most con­tro­ver­sial post

2011-11-10_1105I had no idea this post on the Web­site for Best Made Axe would be as con­tro­ver­sial as it was, but I stand by my ini­tial premise: if you’re going to declare your­self the “best made” it’s only nat­ural to expect to find sub­stan­ti­a­tion of that claim on your Web­site. When that evi­dence isn’t found on the site, it causes doubt in the mind of the consumer.

For­tu­nately for Best Made Co, they do so many other things right with their mar­ket­ing, that the lack of sub­stance on the Web­site hardly mat­ters.  And I think it is to their great credit that both the head of Best Made Co.‘s Face­book fan page and one of the founders of the com­pany came to com­ment on the post.

Also, for what it’s worth, my intent with the post was always to help other small-scale pro­duc­ers under­stand an impor­tant aspect of per­sua­sive web­sites, and not to slam Best Made Co. Any­way, it’s still good read­ing, IMHO:

Your most help­ful post

Inception-Poster2-202x300This is a tough one because all of my posts are aimed at being help­ful. But I think that this post man­aged to tie together a bunch of really worth­while insights in an inter­est­ing and fun pack­age cen­tered around the block­buster flick, Inception:

A post whose suc­cess sur­prised you

2010-01-25_1148-192x300This par­tic­u­lar post was fairly per­sonal and off-topic for me, so I was sur­prised to find out that it res­onated with as many read­ers as it did.  Of course, after a moment’s reflec­tion, it wasn’t sur­pris­ing at all, since the core essay fea­tured in the post has been con­sis­tently pop­u­lar ever since it was first penned by Keith Bell.  Check it out, you’ll prob­a­bly like it too:

A post you feel didn’t get the atten­tion it deserved

on-a-mission-from-godI think most web and direct response copy­writ­ers have been so ingrained with the “reason-why” adver­tis­ing mantra that we some­times don’t know quite what to do when we’re either short on demon­stra­ble points of dif­fer­ence or ben­e­fits, or legally pro­hib­ited from pro­claim­ing them in our adver­tis­ing. This post rep­re­sents at least one tried and true solu­tion to that prob­lem, but it got pre­cious lit­tle atten­tion. I think you’ll like it:

The post that you are most proud of

moneyboothI’m proud to have writ­ten a hand­ful of guest posts for Copy­blog­ger, and espe­cially proud of how well this one turned out. It was a very solid post to begin with and Sonia Simone did a bril­liant job edit­ing it while Brian Clark did his usual amaz­ing job at cre­at­ing a must-read headline:

And that’s it. Thanks for read­ing and a spe­cial thanks to Paul for nom­i­nat­ing me to par­tic­i­pate in this con­test in the first place :)

Comments

  1. Sonia Simone on 11.10.2011

    We were proud of that post as well! Thanks so much for shar­ing it with our folks. :)

    Now I’m off to read your First Class Ticket post …

  2. Jeff on 11.10.2011

    Ah, thanks, Sonia.

  3. Paul Wolfe on 11.10.2011

    Hi Jeff

    That’s a good list of posts — I’ve read most of them. Missed the Copy­blog­ger one some­how — so it was good to get a link to that so I could go read.

    In fact Copy­blog­ger is how I first stum­bled upon you in the first place — for­get which guest post it was, but I instantly con­nected with it and wanted to know more about teh guy who wrote it. That’s you!

    I love the Press­field inter­view too — one of my ‘non busi­ness’ goals is to get my edi­tion of THE WAR OF ART signed, I have a First Edi­tion! (I think i bought it in the first week of publication).

    Talk to you soon. (Thanks for the loop advice too!)

    Paul

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