What tells you it’s time to stop digging?

diggingaholeThat repen­tance is nec­es­sary for sal­va­tion is hardly a prin­ci­ple con­fined to Chris­tian­ity. It’s really as sim­ple as say­ing that if you’ve dug your­self into a hole, you need to:

  1. real­ize you’re in a hole, and
  2. stop dig­ging,
  3. become open to solu­tions (aka, a way out)

Until you do these three things, you won’t have much hope of get­ting out of that hole. Obvi­ously, the sooner you rec­og­nize the hole, the eas­ier the process is. Just as obvi­ously, this applies to busi­nesses as well as individuals.

In fact, a lot of hole-digging in busi­ness involves max­i­miz­ing short term profit at the expense of long-term rep­u­ta­tion, cus­tomer sat­is­fac­tion, prod­uct improve­ment, etc. Mostly because prof­itabil­ity is fer­vently mea­sured while the long term things often don’t even have indi­ca­tors, let alone mea­sure­ments. This means many com­pa­nies don’t real­ize they’ve dug them­selves into a hole until a cri­sis hits.

So what are your early indi­ca­tors for these “soft” or long-term fac­tors? Have you both­ered to set any up, or are crises going to be the only indi­ca­tor that the hole you’ve dug your­self into is deeper than you can climb out of?

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Are you demand­ing a state of grace, or are you will­ing to take peo­ple as they are?

saint-peter-cardOne of the few things I don’t like about Get­ting Things Done is the “state of grace” fac­tor.  Mean­ing you have to start your sys­tem from a point at which every­thing is accounted for on a slip of paper in your in-box, which means you have to take 1–2 days out of your life to get your­self to the start­ing point.

I think that’s one rea­son there are far more vari­ants of GTD and peo­ple using mod­i­fied GTD sys­tems than there are actual GTD prac­ti­tion­ers. Peo­ple like the sys­tem, but most can’t start from that all-too-hard-to-achieve state of grace.

Sim­i­larly, busi­nesses that are will­ing to take peo­ple as they are gen­er­ally do a whole lot bet­ter than busi­nesses that force cus­tomers to have got­ten their ducks in a row beforehand.

Peo­ple want solu­tions, not an “I told you so.”

Think of the dif­fer­ence between a nor­mal uni­ver­sity and most online uni­ver­si­ties. They’ll always be a Har­vard, but I think a lot of 3rd Tier Col­leges and Uni­ver­si­ties are about to get crunched as more and more peo­ple opt for edu­ca­tional alter­na­tives that will take them where they are — lit­er­ally and figuratively.

What about your busi­ness?  Are you will­ing to meet peo­ple where they are - to save them from their past stu­pid­ity if needed — or are you demand­ing cus­tomers enter your doors in a state of grace?

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The object of giv­ing some­thing up is to gain some­thing else

Chris­tians fast and make sac­ri­fices dur­ing Lent  – i.e., they give up tem­po­ral, worldly plea­sures and activ­i­ties — so as to bet­ter con­cen­trate their minds on the eter­nal and the spir­i­tual. It’s not just about giv­ing some­thing up, it’s about elim­i­nat­ing some things to focus more on others.

This is a recog­ni­tion that you can’t just add and add and add with­out hav­ing things get crowded out of the pic­ture — usu­ally the wrong things, the most impor­tant things.

StopDoingListWhile we all tend to end­lessly add To-Dos to our list, there’s only so much time in the day. How many of us actively focus on a Stop Doing list? The idea is to replace less effec­tive and effi­cient strate­gies and prac­tices with more effec­tive ones.  So shouldn’t we have as many “Stop Doing” items as “Start Doings”?

What’s on your “Stop Doing” list?

Back in 1973, Mas­ter Lock ran one of the most effec­tive Super Bowl ads of all time. If you haven’t seen it before, here it is:

YouTube Preview Image

Now, I’m not sure how many crim­i­nals would shoot a lock — seems to me they’d be more likely to just use a pair of bolt cut­ters — but that doesn’t mat­ter, because watch­ing a lock lit­er­ally take a bul­let and still con­tinue to do its job impresses us at a fun­da­men­tal, sym­bolic, and sub­con­scious level.

And it’s this sub­con­scious, largely sym­bolic level where real buy­ing deci­sions are made, which is one rea­son why Mas­ter Lock, bol­stered by the suc­cess of this ad, went on to dom­i­nate the indus­try in 70s and con­tin­ues to be dom­i­nant today.

In fact, peo­ple still talk about this “tough under fire” demon­stra­tion to this day. Heck it fea­tured in an episode of MythBusters.

Of course, the dif­fer­ence between today and the 70’s is that now cus­tomers expect to be able to find more infor­ma­tion on the inter­net. So if Mas­ter Lock were to run an ad like that today, we’d expect to go to the web­site, see the ad, and then get more infor­ma­tion, pre­sum­ably includ­ing an added demon­stra­tion of how the haft of the lock is hard­ened against reg­u­lar bolt cut­ters and such.

In other words, the Web is where we expect busi­nesses to add more info, close more loop­holes, and really con­vince us — all after they’ve impressed us with their mass media ads.

And that brings me to the ad Mas­ter Lock really should have aired last Sun­day. Because you don’t know it, but the front door lock on your house is ridicu­lously, stu­pidly easy to over­come. It doesn’t even require reg­u­lar lock-picking skills or really any­thing close to what one might call spe­cial tools or skills.

Nope. Pick­ing the lock on your house sim­ply requires a bump­key and a few minute demo on how to use it. See for your­self within the first 90 sec­onds of this news special:

YouTube Preview Image

Think you could make a pretty dra­matic ad out of that bit of info?

Yeah. Me too.

Now, here’s the thing — Mas­ter Lock has come up with a lock cylin­der that’s pretty much bump-proof. Unfor­tu­nately their pro­mo­tional video for the tech­nol­ogy is slow, bor­ing, and long. It is, how­ever, convincing:

YouTube Preview Image

So why not have a super dra­matic, riv­et­ing Super Bowl ad that demon­strates lock bump­ing and how exposed 99% of all homes are to the tech­nique, then show­cas­ing how bump-proof Mas­ter Lock’s new lock cylin­ders are?

If you really want to get seri­ous, throw out a challenge:

  • View­ers pick out a replace­ment Mas­ter Lock for their door and order it along with home instal­la­tion to be done by a a local Mas­ter Lock dealer,
  • All of which is FREE if the instal­la­tion crew can’t bump lock the front door lock they’ll be replac­ing on your home.
  • If we can’t open your door lock as easy as this [image of bump lock open­ing] your new Mas­ter Lock is on us!
  • See com­plete details at masterlock.com

What do you want to bet that that ad would sell a boat load of new door locks?

And that’s the ad we should have seen this Super Bowl.